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Study: Testosterone Supplements Cause Plaque Buildup

A new study adds to the growing body of evidence connecting testosterone supplements and heart disease. The National Institutes of Health studied 170 men with an average age slightly above 70, which is the target age group for many testosterone supplements. Study participants who used AndroGel for more than twelve months had a 20 percent higher rate of arteriosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries due to plaque. Such participants also had higher rates of heart disease in general. Despite the known side effects, ads for testosterone supplements routinely tout benefits for older men, almost equating low-t therapy with the fountain of...

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Lawmakers Consider Marijuana ‘Legalization’

State Senator Perry Clark (D-Louisville) introduced a measure that would allow recreational use of cannabis. What effect would such a law have on DUI drug offenses? Much like similar measures in California and about twelve other states, BR 408 would allow Kentuckians 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana (about 50 joints) and/or five plants for cultivation; the proposal would also allow free transfer of the ounce or the plants and allow marijuana consumption on private property with the owner's consent. Penalties for possessing more than an ounce or five plants, as well as smoking marijuana in...

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Deadly Crash Triggers Homicide Charges

Following a single car accident that killed a 16-year-old girl, an 18-year-old woman faces intoxication manslaughter charges.

Marshall County Sheriff’s deputies who responded to the crash scene at Sayler Creek Road and Griggstown Road determined that the driver from Paducah, was intoxicated when she was traveling at a high rate of speed and apparently lost control of her vehicle. Her passenger was pronounced dead at the scene.

Officials originally charged the driver with murder, but subsequently downgraded the charges to second degree manslaughter.

EU Goes Against Grain And Approves Roundup

In a move that highlights the inherent difficulties in proving dangerous product cases, the European Union said it would consider extending Roundup’s license.

A newly-issued study from the European Chemical Agency apparently convinced the agency that Roundup was safe, despite a volume of evidence that glyphosate, which is the weed killer’s active ingredient, causes several forms of cancer. A spokeswoman insisted that the EU had considered “the latest state of scientific research” prior to its announcement. Environmental groups roundly criticized the move. Green Party European Parliament member said it “makes no sense to accept the wide range of risks associated with glyphosate.” The EU set no date for the start of discussions.

The retention of the European market could mean an additional $100 million a year for Roundup manufacturer Monsanto.

Lawmakers Debate Workers’ Compensation Reform

So far, it’s been a rather bumpy ride for House Bill 296, as the workers’ comp legislation is currently in a Senate committee.

Many of the proposed changes are largely technical. For example, in most cases, the bill would cut off medical benefits when the victims reach age 70 or have collected benefits for four years; the current system uses Social Security eligibility as a cutoff. Other alterations, such as the creation of a workers’ comp drug formulary, bring Kentucky’s system more in line with some neighboring states. There are some proposed procedural changes as well, including a provision that would limit the time victims have to file for reconsideration.

Rep. Adam Koenig (R-Frankfort) proposed several successful amendments, including one that increased the average weekly wage and one that extended medical benefits to permanently disabled victims.

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